Data, Model and String Naming

Document No:  D08#24171
 
Revision:  5
 
Date amended:  03-Dec-2015

Image: orange line.RCN-D13^23151823.GIF 

 

The information below is intended to reflect the preferred practice of Main Roads Western Australia ("Main Roads"). Main Roads reserves the right to update this information at any time without notice. If you have any questions or comments please contact Andrew Berry by email or on (08) 9323 4137.

To the extent permitted by law, Main Roads, its employees, agents, authors and contributors are not liable for any loss resulting from any action taken or reliance made by you on the information herein displayed.
 

Revision Register

 

<>tr>
Ed/Version Number Clause Number Description of Revision Date
1 All Guideline Developed. 30-Nov-2001
2 All Combined with Survey and Mapping Data Naming Conventions. Guideline revised and approved. 25-Mar-2003
3 All Guideline revised and approved. 28-Mar-2007
4 1 Update Link for Metadata Statement. 04-Sep-2007
4A Header Guideline Contact amended. 13-Dec-2007
4B Header Guideline Contact changed. 07-Aug-2010
4C Header Contact person amended to Andrew Berry. 17-May-2013
​5​All​Guideline revised and approved​03-Dec-2015

Table of Content


1. INTRODUCTION

This guideline defines the string and model naming conventions for all survey, mapping and design data used or developed for projects undertaken for Main Roads.

MX is the standard design software package used within Main Roads. A "genio" ascii file is the general format used for the transfer of data. The initial headers within this genio file (delete, create and genio) enable users to assign a model name that describes the project location and coordinate grid. When imported into MX these headers create the model name and the associated genio strings are placed in the defined model. In addition the name of the genio file is to also reflect the project location and coordinate grid. A sample MX genio file and a guideline on the naming convention for the model name and associated strings are detailed below.

The logical naming of files is particularly important where alternate formats are used to provide information (Microstation, AutoCAD, Arcinfo export etc.), that don't have the functionality of defining a model name.

In addition to the use of logical naming conventions all survey, mapping and design data shall be accompanied by a Metadata Statement, which will include sufficient information to adequately define:

  • Lineage
  • Positional Accuracy
  • Attribute Accuracy
  • Logical Consistency
  • Completeness of Data


2. FILE NAMING CONVENTION

Logical file names in conjunction with a suitable metadata statement should be used to provide sufficient information to clearly identify the data.

An example where a logical name is not used would be:

survey.gen - The only information a user is likely to impart from this name is that it is an MX genio file (extension .gen) of a survey.

A more logical name would be:

GNH_200_220.gen - Logically this would identify that it is a file containing digital information for Great Northern Highway from 200-220 SLK. The associated metadata statement would identify whether it is survey, design etc.



3. MODEL NAMING CONVENTION

Careful selection of model names shall be taken to avoid confusion when working on large projects with multiple interchanges or intersections. Uniform naming conventions will enable designers to move easily from one project to another. Model names shall contain no more than 28 letters including spaces. Wherever possible the name of a project zone shall be included in the model name.


3.1 Design Models

For design purposes, separate models shall be created for intersections or each interchange. The main alignment and related strings shall be designed in a separate model.

On completion of the design process all relevant strings shall be copied into a master design model for sectioning, volumes calculations, reporting for construction and preparation of final drawings. All redundant strings should be deleted and all relevant strings should have discontinuities introduced where necessary, after being copied into the master design model. The master design model shall contain only strings required for construction.

Naming convention formats for typical design models should be as per the following example, where PCG94 is the local grid used:

    • DESIGN CONCEPT PCG94 - Concept design model
    • DESIGN FINAL PCG94 - Final design model
    • DESIGN ULTIMATE PCG94 - Ultimate design model
    • DESIGN CONCEPT "intersection/interchange name/number" PCG94 - Concept intersection/interchange design
    • SECTIONS CONCEPT PCG94 - Concept sections model
    • SECTIONS FINAL PCG94 - Final sections model
    • SECTIONS ULTIMATE PCG94 - Ultimate sections model
    • SECTIONS CONCEPT "name/number" PCG94 - Concept intersection/interchange sections
    • CADASTRAL PCG94 - Cadastral model
    • SERVICES PCG94 - Services model

These model names are provided as a guide and can be varied to suit the requirements of particular projects. Model names should however be selected logically enabling other designers to access the data easily.


3.2 Survey and Mapping Models

3.2.1 Detail Survey Models

Care should be taken when defining MX model names to ensure that the name is relevant to the data content, survey location and project zone.

For example a detail survey of the intersection of Wellington Street and William Street, Perth, where PCG94 is the local grid used could be called:

WELLINGTON WILLIAM SURVEY PCG94

Whereas a stripped ground survey for a section of the Graham Farmer Freeway, where PCG94 is the local grid used could be called:

GFF LAKE TO WILLIAM STRIP PCG94

To assist in the design process, individual detail surveys and thus model names shall be created for the following:

Where digital information is supplied to other internal or external areas, documentation must also be provided to clearly identify what is being supplied. For further information pertaining to this refer to the following guideline: Data Purchase or Supply Guidelines.

Detail survey models shall have at the minimum, the coordinate zone used in the model name.

Naming convention formats for typical survey and mapping models where, PCG94 is the local grid used, should be as per the following example:

    • "PROJECT NAME" SURVEY PCG94
    • "PROJECT NAME" BOUNDARY PCG94
    • "PROJECT NAME" CADASTRAL PCG94
    • "PROJECT NAME" SERVICES PCG94
    • "PROJECT NAME" CONTOURS PCG94
    • "PROJECT NAME" AUDIT PCG94 

These model names are provided as a guide and can be varied to suit the requirements of particular projects. Model names should however be selected logically enabling other designers to access the data easily.



4. STRING NAMING CONVENTION

4.1 Design Strings

Surfaces and features are represented as a group of strings with string labels consisting of four alphanumeric characters.

Main Roads has adopted the National MX string naming convention and feature set. The string names, detailed at section 4.3 shall be used for all Main Roads design projects and are compatible with the default MXRoad string naming convention and feature set. The labels detailed at section 4.3 are the first two characters of the string label.

Consideration should be given to defining the 3rd character of string labels to particular intersections and/or interchanges.

For example "ES10" would refer to a shoulder string located at intersection number 1 on the left hand side. This particular naming convention allows strings to be grouped according to the intersection(s) where they are situated, making it easier for other MX users and designers to locate a design string when necessary.

String label "TTTT" is a special string and should not be used.

The Road and Traffic Engineering Branch has developed a feature design style set meeting the requirements of the National String Naming Convention. This feature set also conforms to the Main Roads Drawing Presentation Guideline.



4.2 Survey and Mapping Strings

A digital terrain model can be represented by a number of string or point features with each feature label consisting of four alphanumeric characters.

Main Roads has developed a detailed list of string naming conventions to be used in all Main Roads survey and mapping projects.

The feature coding for topographical surveys are detailed in the 67-08-43 Digital Ground Survey. All feature labels shall be used in strict accordance with this list.

Undergroung utilities surveys codes are detailed in 67-08-121.

In the case of mapping projects, not all codes are used. For a list of feature codes applicable for mapping projects refer to Appendix B of 67-08-44 Digital Photogrammetric Mapping.

Where a particular unique feature does not have a corresponding feature code and is considered to be significant, it shall be captured and supplied in an appropriate MX format, with a unique feature code. On registration and lodgement of the digital data, the associated documentation shall include a summary of all non-standard strings captured, including the MX code used.



4.3 Main Roads String Naming Convention

The Main Roads String Naming Convention has been based on the National String Naming Convention. The following table gives standard string labels used for naming of strings in design models. The characters listed below represent the first two string label characters.

The Main Roads String Naming Convention adopts different alphanumeric characters for left and right offsets. These characters are placed in the 4th field of the string label:

Left hand side - 0 to 9 and A to H
Right hand side - I to Z


MAIN ROADS STRING NAMING CONVENTION

DESCRIPTION

LABEL

GENERAL DESIGN STRINGS

Carriageway (Taper)

C0 - -

Carriageway (Median Edge)

C1- -

Carriageway (Bitumen Edge)

CE - -

Carriageway (Gutter Invert)

CF - -

Carriageway (Hinge)

CH - -

Carriageway ( Material Edge)

CM - -

Carriageway (Wing Kerb Return)

CR - -

Carriageway (Hard Strip)

CS - -

Carriageway (Top of Kerb)

CT - -

Carriageway (Median Edge - 6D)

MA - -

Shoulder (Back of Kerb)

EB - -

Shoulder (Gutter Invert)

EF - -

Shoulder (Earthworks Datum)

EH - -

Shoulder (High Side Turn Down)

ER - -

Shoulder (Edge)

ES - -

Shoulder (Verge)

EV - -

Shoulder (Front of Footpath)

EW - -

Shoulder (Back of Footpath)

EX - -

Earthworks (Interface)

IA - -

Earthworks (Cut Berm)

IB - -

Earthworks (Intermediate)

IC - -

Earthworks (Front of Ditch)

ID - -

Earthworks (Back of Ditch)

IE - -

Earthworks (Bottom of Ditch)

IF - -

Earthworks (Noise Bund)

IN - -

Earthworks (Fill Berm)

IS - -

Earthworks (Broken Hinge)

IZ - -

Road Reference Line (Natural Surface)

NC - -

Road Reference Line

MC - -

Road Reference Line (Geometry)

GC - -

Carriageway (Fillet M-String)

MR - -

Traffic Islands (Top of Kerb)

TT - -

Traffic Islands (6D)

MT - -

Fence

FN - -

Bridge Abutments

BA - -

Bridge Piers

BP - -

Bridge Deck

BB - -

Concrete Barrier

BC - -

Safety Fence

BS - -

Safety Fence (W-Beam)

BW - -

Construction Joint / Cut on Existing

NJ - -

Subgrade Strings

S - - -

Volume Strings

VO - -

Retaining Wall Bottom

WB - -

Retaining Wall Top

WT - -

Boundary

BD - -

Text String

*- - -

DRAINAGE STRINGS

Culvert

DB - -

Canal

DC - -

Pipe (Invert)

DI - -

Pipe (Top)

DT - -

Hydraulic Grade Line

DH - -

Pipe (Design Surface)

DD - -

Pipe (Survey Surface)

DS - -

Headwall

SH - -

Drain (Centre of)

DR - -

LINEMARKING STRINGS

Line 9x3

L3 - -

Line 1x1

L1 - -

Continuity Line

LA - -

Barrier Line Double Unbroken

LD - -

Edgeline

LE - -

Hold Line up to 0.3 Wide

LH3 - -

Hold Line up to 0.45Wide

LH4 - -

Hold Line up to 0.6 Wide

LH6 - -

Barrier Line Left Broken

LL - -

Diagonal Marking Outline

LO - -

Pedestrian Crossing

LP - -

Barrier Line Right Broken

LR - -

Stop Line up to 0.3 Wide

LS3 - -

Stop Line up to 0.45 Wide

LS4 - -

Stop Line up to 0.6 Wide

LS6 - -

Turning Line

LT - -

Painted Line Unbroken

LU - -


Typical examples of the application of the above string naming conventions are shown on the figures below.



5. TYPICAL EXAMPLES OF MAIN ROADS STRING NAMING CONVENTION


Figure 5.1.GIF 


Figure 5.2.GIF 

FIGURE 5.2  MX STRING LABELS - DUAL CARRIAGEWAY (KERBED)


Figure 5.3.GIF 

FIGURE 5.3  MX STRING LABELS - DUAL CARRIAGEWAY/FREEWAY


Figure 5.4.GIF 

FIGURE 5.4  MX STRING LABELS - PLAN VIEW


Figure 5.5.GIF 

 FIGURE 5.5  MX STRING LABELS - PROFILE VIEW


Figure 5.6.GIF 

FIGURE 5.6  MX STRING LABELS - INTERCHANGE PLAN VIEW